Tag Archives: Paul Cézanne

People’s Choice Award: No. 1

Edgar Degas. Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen. Original model 1881; this cast 1919‑1921. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Alice Morawetz Bequest Fund, BMA 1943.1

Edgar Degas. Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen. Original model 1881; this cast 1919‑1921. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Alice Morawetz Bequest Fund, BMA 1943.1

Over the past 100 days, we’ve taken you on an insider’s exploration of the BMA’s collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. We’ve seen objects from all over the world, including Mali, Japan, Italy, and America; we’ve looked at paintings and prints, record players, decomposing fruit skins, and delicate textiles. The project has highlighted some of our favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

Now it’s time to discover your favorite pieces in the BMA collection. To celebrate our 100th Anniversary, we invited everyone to vote for their favorite artwork from a group of 100 selected by the Museum’s chief curator, with voting closing on December 21.

From December 22, we’ve been counting down the top 10 works of art on social media, one each day until the end of the year. Today, we reveal the number 1 work of art in our collection according to you.

So, what do you love? Your favorite works of art are:

  1. Edgar Degas. Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen. Original model 1881; this cast 1919‑1921.
  2. Auguste Rodin. The Thinker. Original model 1880; this cast 1904‑1917.
  3. Striding Lion. Syria (present-day Turkey). 5th century.
  4. Henri Matisse. Interior with Dog. 1934.
  5. Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte‑Victoire Seen from the Bibémus Quarry. c. 1897.
  6. Dan Flavin. Untitled (To Barnett Newman for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”). 1993‑1994.
  7. Georgia O’Keeffe. Pink Tulip. 1926.
  8. Paul Gauguin. Vahine no te vi (Woman of the Mango). 1892.
  9. John Frederick Kensett. View on the Hudson. 1865.
  10. Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun. Princess Anna Alexandrovna Galitzin. c. 1797.
The People's Choice top 10 works, shown in order.

The People’s Choice top 10 works, shown in order.

People’s Choice Award: No. 5

Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte‑Victoire Seen from the Bibémus Quarry. c. 1897. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.196

Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte‑Victoire Seen from the Bibémus Quarry. c. 1897. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.196

To celebrate our 100th Anniversary, we invited everyone to vote for their favorite artwork from a group of 100 selected by the Museum’s chief curator.

Your 5th favorite work in the BMA collection is Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte‑Victoire Seen from the Bibémus Quarry. c. 1897.

See our BMA Voices post on this work of art.

BMA Voices: Strolling with Pissarro

Camille Pissarro. Strollers on a Country Road, La Varenne Saint Hilaire. 1864. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The George A. Lucas Collection, purchased with funds from the State of Maryland, Laurence and Stella Bendann Fund, and contributions from individuals, foundations, and corporations throughout the Baltimore community, BMA 1996.45.221

Camille Pissarro. Strollers on a Country Road, La Varenne Saint Hilaire. 1864. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The George A. Lucas Collection, purchased with funds from the State of Maryland, Laurence and Stella Bendann Fund, and contributions from individuals, foundations, and corporations throughout the Baltimore community, BMA 1996.45.221

Katy Rothkopf, Senior Curator & Dept Head of European Painting & Sculpture

When I arrived at the Museum almost 15 years ago, I spent a lot of time familiarizing myself with the paintings in the collection. I was particularly intrigued by this small work by Camille Pissarro, Strollers on a Country Road, La Varenne Saint Hilaire, which looked so different from the other paintings by the Impressionist artist that were much more familiar to me. The way he applied paint to the canvas, the sense of structure and form, and the clear use of light were all were very different from his more typical Impressionistic explorations of light and color. This interest led to a research project, culminating in a major exhibition, where we traced Pissarro’s evolution from a young artist, struggling to produce large paintings for the annual Salon exhibitions in Paris, to the Impressionist master that is so well known today.

In 1864, Pissarro produced this intimate view of the countryside near the Marne River east of Paris. He had arrived in Paris from his home of St. Thomas in 1855, and spent time studying in small studios, becoming friends with younger painters, such as Paul Cézanne and Claude Monet. At that time, to receive recognition from critics and the general public, artists submitted works to the annual Salon held in Paris, where a jury would carefully choose works for the show. Pissarro had modest success exhibiting in the annual Salons of the 1860s with several large landscape paintings that are similar in style to Strollers on a Country Road, La Varenne Saint Hilaire, but he was soon looking for another way to express his artistic vision.

In the late 1860s, Pissarro moved to Louveciennes, a small town west of Paris. There he was able to spend more time with his Impressionist colleagues, becoming fascinated with working outdoors. In the winter of 1869-70, after a series of snowstorms, Pissarro and Monet painted the unique quality of the atmosphere and light in winter side by side. Pissarro’s works subsequently became more experimental and innovative. In 1874, the first Impressionist exhibition was held in Paris, where progressive artists could show their work without a jury, allowing new artistic freedom for the first time. The Impressionists held eight independent shows between 1874 and 1886, with Pissarro as the only artist to exhibit in all of them.

Read more about this work in A hidden Pissarro.

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.