Tag Archives: Interior with Dog

People’s Choice Award: No. 1

Edgar Degas. Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen. Original model 1881; this cast 1919‑1921. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Alice Morawetz Bequest Fund, BMA 1943.1

Edgar Degas. Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen. Original model 1881; this cast 1919‑1921. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Alice Morawetz Bequest Fund, BMA 1943.1

Over the past 100 days, we’ve taken you on an insider’s exploration of the BMA’s collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. We’ve seen objects from all over the world, including Mali, Japan, Italy, and America; we’ve looked at paintings and prints, record players, decomposing fruit skins, and delicate textiles. The project has highlighted some of our favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

Now it’s time to discover your favorite pieces in the BMA collection. To celebrate our 100th Anniversary, we invited everyone to vote for their favorite artwork from a group of 100 selected by the Museum’s chief curator, with voting closing on December 21.

From December 22, we’ve been counting down the top 10 works of art on social media, one each day until the end of the year. Today, we reveal the number 1 work of art in our collection according to you.

So, what do you love? Your favorite works of art are:

  1. Edgar Degas. Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen. Original model 1881; this cast 1919‑1921.
  2. Auguste Rodin. The Thinker. Original model 1880; this cast 1904‑1917.
  3. Striding Lion. Syria (present-day Turkey). 5th century.
  4. Henri Matisse. Interior with Dog. 1934.
  5. Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte‑Victoire Seen from the Bibémus Quarry. c. 1897.
  6. Dan Flavin. Untitled (To Barnett Newman for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”). 1993‑1994.
  7. Georgia O’Keeffe. Pink Tulip. 1926.
  8. Paul Gauguin. Vahine no te vi (Woman of the Mango). 1892.
  9. John Frederick Kensett. View on the Hudson. 1865.
  10. Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun. Princess Anna Alexandrovna Galitzin. c. 1797.
The People's Choice top 10 works, shown in order.

The People’s Choice top 10 works, shown in order.

People’s Choice Award: No. 4

Henri Matisse. Interior with Dog. 1934. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.257. © 2013 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse. Interior with Dog. 1934. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.257. © 2013 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

To celebrate our 100th Anniversary, we invited everyone to vote for their favorite artwork from a group of 100 selected by the Museum’s chief curator.

Your 4th favorite work in the BMA collection is Henri Matisse. Interior with Dog. 1934.

Learn more about this piece in our BMA Voices video on Henri Matisse’s The Yellow Dress.

BMA Voices: “The Yellow Dress”, part three.

This is the third of four explorations into Henri Matisse’s The Yellow Dress by Jay Fisher, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs. In part one, we find out more about Matisse’s process, and discover how this dress relates to his history and life. In part two, we see some of the studies for the painting, and learn more about other related works. 

In this episode, we look at two paintings that followed The Yellow Dress, to see how Matisse’s work developed after this important piece.

Featuring:

Henri Matisse. Large Reclining Nude. 1935. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.258. © 2013 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse. Interior with Dog. 1934. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.257. © 2013 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

Reproduction, including downloading of Henri Matisse works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.