Tag Archives: Gabriel Orozco

Meditating on water

Gabriel Orozco. Darth Vader. 2014. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Alan and Carol Edelman Acquisition Fund, BMA 2014.114. © Gabriel Orozco

Gabriel Orozco. Darth Vader. 2014. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Alan and Carol Edelman Acquisition Fund, BMA 2014.114. © Gabriel Orozco

Gabriel Orozco, like Felix Gonzalez-Torres, is a master at revealing the poignancy of humble materials and the significance of seemingly casual encounters. Orozco’s photograph, Darth Vader, 2014, is a recent gift to the BMA’s collection. In it, the world looks back at us as we gaze into a mirror-smooth puddle that has collected in an overturned umbrella. The trees that are reflected in the water drop their leaves, sprinkling a bright visual confetti over the black umbrella and brown and grey pavement. The remarkable aspect of this deceptively simple composition lies in Orozco’s ability to notice exceptional details within a common scene and present them so that we can recognize beauty in the most inconspicuous elements of our daily lives. We learn to appreciate the potential for humor and playfulness in the everyday as well.  Here, Orozco’s title clues us into the menacing black helmet of a pop culture villain that can be deciphered in the otherwise delicate shapes of the puddle and umbrella.

As an image that transforms the image of water into a broader meditation, Orozco’s photograph speaks to Gonzalez-Torres’s “Untitled” (Water), 1995, one of the most beloved works in the BMA’s collection.  Gonzalez-Torres created a sensation of the luminosity, movement, and therapeutic qualities of water by focusing on another seemingly modest item—plastic beads more conventionally seen as a cheap and somewhat tacky way to curtain off doorways and portions of rooms.  Through the artist’s vision, these beads—repeated in a specific sequence of blue, clear and silver strands and elongated to fill the given doorway of an exhibition space—transform into a delightful, interactive experience. People are invited to walk through Gonzalez-Torres’s sculpture, touching the undulating surfaces, listening to the rustle of the swinging of strands, and being enveloped in the light glinting off each small colored sphere. The piece so engages the senses that one is at least momentarily “cleansed” of concerns and distractions, and reminded that such pleasurable and celebratory sensations can be found in common objects.

Felix Gonzalez Torres. "Untitled" (Water). 1995. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchase with exchange funds from Bequest of Saidie A. May, BMA 1995.73. © The Felix Gonzalez Torres Foundation

Felix Gonzalez-Torres. “Untitled” (Water). 1995. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchase with exchange funds from Bequest of Saidie A.
May, BMA 1995.73. © The Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation