Tag Archives: community

Pleased to Meet You! Caroline Lampinen joins BMA staff

Carolineweb

Caroline Lampinen: Community Engagement Coordinator

The BMA is excited to introduce the newest member of the Education team, Caroline Lampinen, who joins us as the Community Engagement Coordinator. She works closely with the Manager of Community Engagement, Dave Eassa, to facilitate programming with the BMA Outpost across Baltimore.

What is the BMA Outpost?

The BMA Outpost is a community initiative of the Baltimore Museum of Art, acting as a nomadic and flexible mobile museum that collaborates with a wide range of stakeholders across the city of Baltimore for periods of three months at a time. The Outpost engages communities through artmaking, conversations, and visual connections to the BMA’s physical collection. The Outpost’s democratic and collaborative programming is guided by the overarching theme of “home” and the diverse representations and emotions that each individual can bring to the conversations around home. The BMA Outpost encourages residents to contribute drawings, paintings, ideas, and conversations to build a museum about their community by the community. It becomes a space where the unrecorded conversations and dialogue are just as important as the ideas documented and contributed through visual art.

Who is Caroline?

Caroline grew up in metro-Detroit with a musician father and nurse mother. After earning a BFA in Graphic Design from Western Michigan University, she moved to rural Arkansas where she taught literacy for four years and coached novice teachers for three, earning a Master’s in Educational Leadership along the way. From there she spent a year as an Education Pioneers Fellow at Denver Public Schools. Her passions include building, fostering, and teaching inclusive and equitable practices for all people in all industries; running; spending time with her rescue dog, Blue; and art making.

Visit the Outpost!

Starting Jan. 23, the BMA Outpost will begin its next three-month collaborations with the Loch Raven VA Clinic working with veterans, and at the Cherry Hill Town Center working with the residents of Cherry Hill.

Caroline will be facilitating programming at Cherry Hill Town Center, collaborating with Catholic Charities to turn an unused store front into a dynamic arts and community space for the next three months.

Come visit any time during our open hours! Be sure to check our website, Instagram, and our Facebook and Twitter pages for any changes, or to find out about any of our other amazing programs!

Cherry Hill Town Center Hours:

Tuesday: 3pm-7pm
Wednesday: 4-8pm
Thursday: 3pm-7pm

Artist Mark Bradford speaks at first Necessity of Tomorrow(s) event

How do you make a path to power where none exists? How do you assess a community’s needs and create access and opportunities for self-determination?

Artist Mark Bradford and BMA Director Christopher Bedford explored these topics and more during the first event of our new series, The Necessity of Tomorrow(s).

WATCH:

On Saturday, November 11th, guests filled the pews of Union Baptist Church to hear Bradford discuss his childhood experiences and lessons learned, his artistic practice, and commitment to community-based work. Doors opened with live performances curated by the Baltimore-based group SunSets with spoken word by Kondwani Fidel and jazz selections by Clarence Ward III & Dat Feel Good band.

The conversation, which was also streamed live at Morgan State University’s Turpin-Lamb Theater, touched on the launch of our upcoming partnership with Bradford, the Greenmount West Community Center (GWCC), and Noisy Tenants to provide skills-based training and equipment to begin a silk-screening project at the GWCC with Baltimore youth.

The Necessity of Tomorrow(s), invites nationally and internationally acclaimed artists and thinkers to Baltimore for conversations on art, race, and justice. The series borrows its title from an essay by science fiction author Samuel Delany who argues for the role of creative speculation in making a more just future. The BMA is encouraging communities throughout Baltimore to come together for these creative conversations.

What’s your tomorrow? How do we get there? Share your thoughts at bmatomorrows.org.

BMA Outpost finds Home in Remington, Upton neighborhoods

The BMA Outpost is the mobile museum of the Baltimore Museum of Art, a flexible and nomadic art making space that works with different communities across Baltimore City for three months at a time.

Every day the Outpost sets up, it builds a Museum around the idea of “Home” and encourages residents to contribute drawings, paintings, ideas, and conversations. It becomes a space where the unrecorded conversations and dialogue are just as important as the ideas documented and contributed through art.

This fall, the BMA Outpost has been in residence in the city’s Remington and Upton neighborhoods, working with Church of the Guardian Angel, R. House, and the Union Baptist Church as host sites.

The BMA Outpost at the Church of the Guardian Angel in Baltimore's Remington neighborhood.

BMA Outpost at the Church of the Guardian Angel in Baltimore’s Remington neighborhood.

Talking about the idea of home quickly becomes complex and loaded for everyone. Home is a relationship that can bring up feelings of happiness, confusion, anger, frustration, love, and everything else that could fall on the spectrum of human emotion.

Individuals can have many different associations with the idea, thinking about their nuclear family and place of residence, as well as a more expanded view of how they relate to their community. While our communities are constantly in flux and changing—sometimes for the better sometimes for the worse—art-making and dialogue can help us envision ideal futures and different realities.

Art can be a catalyst for us to ask, “What would a better future look like?” while also recognizing and honoring past histories.

In Remington, the Outpost has been working with Church of the Guardian Angel every Saturday from 10am to 2pm, in conjunction with the Church’s Thrift Store hours, as well as at R. House for “Remington Night” every Thursday from 3pm to 7pm.

Remington as a neighborhood has vastly changed in the last decade, with a major influx of development from companies like Seawall Development. As change happens rapidly, how does a community work together to envision a brighter future that includes everyone? The Outpost poses this question to Remington residents to encourage dialogue across the boundaries of age, gender, class, and others, to not only think about what that brighter future sounds and looks like, but to also develop real actions to move towards those goals. The Outpost strives to create a space for both agreement and dissent, as art-making can be a powerful tool to bring people together and find commonalities.

The BMA Outpost at Union Baptist Church in Baltimore's Upton neighborhood.

BMA Outpost at Union Baptist Church in Baltimore’s Upton neighborhood.

In Upton, the Union Baptist Church and the BMA Outpost have created a pop-up museum called “Art and Spirit,” which nods to the longstanding histories of the Upton neighborhood, the Church’s home since 1905.

The Upton neighborhood has deep ties and major contributions to African American liberation and autonomy, Civil Rights era activism, community building, and boasts many past residents and architectural structures of historical significance. Dr. Harvey Johnson’s pastoral and civic achievements, and the childhood home of Thurgood Marshall, the first African American individual to serve on the Supreme Court, are just pieces of Upton’s history.

Art and Spirit is inspired by past Soul Schools of the neighborhood, which were unofficial places of thought, organizing, and support in the Upton community. They were places where young people learned from their elders with a deep sense of community as the social fabric. Art and Spirit is a reflection of the creative community of the past, present, and future of Upton. Art and Spirit is open every Tuesday and Wednesday from 1pm to 5pm and Thursdays from 8am to 12pm.

BMA Outpost visitors with City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke in Remington.

BMA Outpost visitors with City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke in Remington.

The BMA Outpost’s collaborations with the Remington and Upton communities will culminate in an exhibition at R. House highlighting the work created. The exhibition will be on view and open to the public in December 2017.

Beginning in January 2018, the Outpost will begin new collaborations with the Cherry Hill Town Center in south Baltimore, and the Loch Raven VA Clinic in northeast Baltimore through March 2018.

Find the BMA Outpost online HERE.

(Author: Dave Eassa, Manager of Community Engagement at the BMA)

We’re on Instagram!

Nick Cave. Detail, Soundsuit. 2013. © Nick Cave. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Nick Cave. Detail, Soundsuit. 2013. © Nick Cave. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Today is Museums on Instagram day, where museums from all over the world share photographs that bring the museum to life, and for the first time The Baltimore Museum of Art is one of them. This morning, we posted our first photographs to Instagram, and we’ll continue to use the platform to share the moments and works of art that inspire us daily.

Joining Instagram is the latest in a series of steps we’ve recently taken to increase our social media presence, including renewed attention to our Twitter account, the Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs’ Tumblr, and this blog. This is particularly important for us as we approach our 100th birthday because we’re focused on reconnecting with our communities ­– learning who you are, what you’re interested in, and how we can better connect with you. For us, being social really is about an exchange of ideas and opening up space for conversation, and we can only do that if we’re in the same places as our community.

The BMA has a long history of seeking to connect with its communities to gain their feedback. In 1937, the Museum’s Trustees surveyed 225 organizations in Baltimore. Their responses would go on to inform programming and the Museum’s approach for several years.

The 1937 museum questionnaire

The 1937 museum questionnaire

In coming days, we’ll be announcing another initiative that will further connect the work that happens inside the building to our communities. In the meantime, join us on our new Instagram account baltimoremuseumofart, on Twitter and Facebook, and follow the #InstaMuseum hashtag to see what museums all over the world are doing.

Let us know what you think. Which social media channels do you use for art, and why? What would you like to see us doing more of? We’d love to hear from you.