Tag Archives: Baltimore

BMA Outpost finds Home in Remington, Upton neighborhoods

The BMA Outpost is the mobile museum of the Baltimore Museum of Art, a flexible and nomadic art making space that works with different communities across Baltimore City for three months at a time.

Every day the Outpost sets up, it builds a Museum around the idea of “Home” and encourages residents to contribute drawings, paintings, ideas, and conversations. It becomes a space where the unrecorded conversations and dialogue are just as important as the ideas documented and contributed through art.

This fall, the BMA Outpost has been in residence in the city’s Remington and Upton neighborhoods, working with Church of the Guardian Angel, R. House, and the Union Baptist Church as host sites.

The BMA Outpost at the Church of the Guardian Angel in Baltimore's Remington neighborhood.

BMA Outpost at the Church of the Guardian Angel in Baltimore’s Remington neighborhood.

Talking about the idea of home quickly becomes complex and loaded for everyone. Home is a relationship that can bring up feelings of happiness, confusion, anger, frustration, love, and everything else that could fall on the spectrum of human emotion.

Individuals can have many different associations with the idea, thinking about their nuclear family and place of residence, as well as a more expanded view of how they relate to their community. While our communities are constantly in flux and changing—sometimes for the better sometimes for the worse—art-making and dialogue can help us envision ideal futures and different realities.

Art can be a catalyst for us to ask, “What would a better future look like?” while also recognizing and honoring past histories.

In Remington, the Outpost has been working with Church of the Guardian Angel every Saturday from 10am to 2pm, in conjunction with the Church’s Thrift Store hours, as well as at R. House for “Remington Night” every Thursday from 3pm to 7pm.

Remington as a neighborhood has vastly changed in the last decade, with a major influx of development from companies like Seawall Development. As change happens rapidly, how does a community work together to envision a brighter future that includes everyone? The Outpost poses this question to Remington residents to encourage dialogue across the boundaries of age, gender, class, and others, to not only think about what that brighter future sounds and looks like, but to also develop real actions to move towards those goals. The Outpost strives to create a space for both agreement and dissent, as art-making can be a powerful tool to bring people together and find commonalities.

The BMA Outpost at Union Baptist Church in Baltimore's Upton neighborhood.

BMA Outpost at Union Baptist Church in Baltimore’s Upton neighborhood.

In Upton, the Union Baptist Church and the BMA Outpost have created a pop-up museum called “Art and Spirit,” which nods to the longstanding histories of the Upton neighborhood, the Church’s home since 1905.

The Upton neighborhood has deep ties and major contributions to African American liberation and autonomy, Civil Rights era activism, community building, and boasts many past residents and architectural structures of historical significance. Dr. Harvey Johnson’s pastoral and civic achievements, and the childhood home of Thurgood Marshall, the first African American individual to serve on the Supreme Court, are just pieces of Upton’s history.

Art and Spirit is inspired by past Soul Schools of the neighborhood, which were unofficial places of thought, organizing, and support in the Upton community. They were places where young people learned from their elders with a deep sense of community as the social fabric. Art and Spirit is a reflection of the creative community of the past, present, and future of Upton. Art and Spirit is open every Tuesday and Wednesday from 1pm to 5pm and Thursdays from 8am to 12pm.

BMA Outpost visitors with City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke in Remington.

BMA Outpost visitors with City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke in Remington.

The BMA Outpost’s collaborations with the Remington and Upton communities will culminate in an exhibition at R. House highlighting the work created. The exhibition will be on view and open to the public in December 2017.

Beginning in January 2018, the Outpost will begin new collaborations with the Cherry Hill Town Center in south Baltimore, and the Loch Raven VA Clinic in northeast Baltimore through March 2018.

Find the BMA Outpost online HERE.

(Author: Dave Eassa, Manager of Community Engagement at the BMA)

A local icon

When I first moved to Baltimore from Chicago, the questions most often posed by friends were regarding John Waters and the depiction of Baltimore in his films. At the time, the references were lost on me, but it didn’t take long for me to discover that the renowned director, celebrated for campy and at times raunchy films set in his hometown, is synonymous with the city.

Prior to the BMA’s Campaign for Art, the Museum’s collection included just one work by Waters. Dorothy Malone’s Collar, a photomontage from 1996, is a quintessential example of Waters’ early foray into appropriation art. The work, which resembles a horizontal photo strip, begins with an image of an eponymous title screen followed by nine stills of actress Dorothy Malone sporting her signature upturned collar. The artist obtained each image by scouring hours of film, pausing the movie, and taking a picture of the frozen scene on his television screen. The format proved a natural means for Waters to share his sharp observation, wit, and love of film with an expanded audience.

John Waters. John Jr.. 2009. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, BMA 2010.13. © John Waters, Courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery

John Waters. John Jr.. 2009. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, BMA 2010.13. © John Waters, Courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery

In 2010, contemporary photography collectors Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker gave the Museum John Jr., 2009. Once again, Waters found inspiration in another artist’s work. The source is a pastel portrait by a respected Baltimore portraitist who was commissioned by Waters’ parents to capture the artist as a boy. Waters took a picture of the pastel and manipulated it ever so slightly by using Photoshop to add a hint of the trademark pencil mustache that he has worn for most of his adult life. Through this simple gesture the artist unites his juvenile and mature selves. Considering the resulting image, it is just as easy to imagine that Waters was a precocious child as it is to see that the child in him lives on.

John Waters. Kiddie Flamingos. 2014. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Dr. Max Stern Trust Fund; gift of the Friends of Modern and Contemporary Art; Alice and Franklin Cooley Fund; and purchased as the gift of an Anonymous Donor, BMA 2015.85. © John Waters, Courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery

John Waters. Kiddie Flamingos. 2014. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Dr. Max Stern Trust Fund; gift of the Friends of Modern and Contemporary Art; Alice and Franklin Cooley Fund; and purchased as the gift of an Anonymous Donor, BMA 2015.85. © John Waters, Courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery

In 2015 a donation from the BMA’s Friends of Modern and Contemporary Art facilitated the acquisition of one of Waters’ most recent works, Kiddie Flamingos, 2014. Like Dorothy Malone’s Collar and John Jr., the work grew out of another artwork—the artist’s notorious film Pink Flamingos, 1972. The movie, which put Waters on the map as “The Pope of Trash,” quickly became a cult classic and continues to shock viewers. In Kiddie Flamingos, children perform a table reading of Waters’ adaptation of Pink Flamingos for a general audience. Seated in front of a backdrop featuring a trailer home, the kids wear clothing, wigs, and accessories that evoke the unforgettable characters of the original film. Waters’ distinctive voice delivers stage directions off camera while the children earnestly perform their roles in this remake of the battle for the title of “the filthiest people alive.” Those who have seen the original film will recognize that, though purged of its obscenity, the new script artfully alludes to the indelible scenes that make Pink Flamingos scandalous to this day.

John Waters’ reputation precedes him and in many circles he is regarded as the face of Baltimore. It is a fitting tribute to the local icon that two of his works joined the BMA’s collection through the Museum’s Campaign for Art.

John Jr. is on view through May 8, 2016 in New Arrivals: Maryland Artists.
Kiddie Flamingos will be running on a continuous loop in the Museum’s Black Box from September 21, 2016 to January 22, 2017.

 

BMA Voices: “The Yellow Dress”, part four.

Henri Matisse. The Yellow Dress. 1929 1931. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.256. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse. The Yellow Dress. 1929 1931. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.256. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

This is the final of four explorations into Henri Matisse’s “The Yellow Dress” by Jay Fisher, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs. In this piece, we consider the collector. How did The Yellow Dress come to Baltimore, and become part of the BMA’s collection? And what does that tell us about Matisse?

Review the previous videos in this series: In part one, we find out more about Matisse’s process, and discover how this dress relates to his history and life. In part two, we see some of the studies for the painting, and learn more about other related works. Part three shows us two paintings that followed The Yellow Dress, to see how Matisse’s work developed after this important piece.

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

Reproduction, including downloading of Henri Matisse works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

BMA Voices: The Blue Eyes

Henri Matisse. The Blue Eyes. 1935. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.259. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse. The Blue Eyes. 1935. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.259. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Katy Rothkopf, Senior Curator & Dept Head of European Painting & Sculpture

Henri Matisse’s small, but powerful, painting The Blue Eyes was created in 1935. It features an intimate view of Lydia Delectorskaya, a Russian woman who met the artist when she was hired as a nurse for his wife. Lydia began to model for the French master in 1935, later becoming his studio assistant, muse, and Matisse’s companion for the rest of his life.

In 1935, when The Blue Eyes was produced, Matisse was just starting to paint again after a three-year hiatus from making oil paintings. In the late 1920s, Matisse had received some criticism for producing so many decorative paintings of women in interiors, often dressed in exotic costumes. He decided to take a break, and travelled abroad, created his first illustrated book, as well as completed a major mural project for the Barnes Foundation outside of Philadelphia. When he returned to producing oil paintings in 1934, Matisse had a new sense of energy and excitement in his work. His exploration of space and his love of texture and pattern began to emerge in new ways.

During his hiatus, Matisse came to Baltimore to pay his condolences to Etta Cone, one of his most important collectors, whose sister Claribel had died the previous year. During that visit in 1930, he saw all of the wonderful pieces the Cone sisters had purchased for their collection, including his own works that he had not seen for a long time, as well as paintings by many of his great artistic heroes. After his visit Matisse and Etta became even closer friends. When the artist returned to making oil paintings in 1934, he began to make works with the Cone Collection in mind, wanting to ensure that Etta’s collection was as strong as it could be.

The Blue Eyes is a composition that seems very spontaneous and immediate, but, in fact, the artist worked on perfecting the pose several times. Matisse was very taken by this idea of a woman seated in a casual pose, leaning on the back of a chair with her head resting on her arms. While working on a drawing with a similar pose, Matisse took photographs of the work in progress and sent them to Etta. She was so taken with the images that she could not resist purchasing the related painting from her favorite artist.

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

Reproduction, including downloading of Henri Matisse works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

BMA Voices: Paintings of an earlier Baltimore

Jacob Glushakow. Light Snowfall. 1939. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of the Municipal Art Society, Baltimore, BMA 1946.68

Jacob Glushakow. Light Snowfall. 1939. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of the Municipal Art Society, Baltimore, BMA 1946.68

Rob Morgan, Collections Database Administrator

Although technically not a native son (he was born on a ship carrying migrants from Europe to America) you can’t get much more Baltimore than Jacob Glushakow. Growing up in east Baltimore at Eden and Baltimore streets, Glushakow graduated from City College and studied at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Not surprisingly, his artwork focused on Baltimore, painting scenes that are now extinct in the city, such as the old harbor, tailor shops, and street life of the mid-20th century.

Glushakow was born in 1914 on a ship crossing the Atlantic. His parents were Russian Jews leaving Europe at the beginning of World War I. The oldest of 11 children, his father Abraham David was a clothing presser and candy maker and his mother Esther Novikov a homemaker. As a teenager, Glushakow started selling cartoons and drawings. For the next seventy years Jacob supported himself as an artist and art teacher while painting street scenes of Baltimore life, completing over a thousand works before his death in 2000.

The painting above is one of seven Glushakow paintings owned by the BMA. Dating to 1939, and entitled Light Snowfall, the work is typical of Glushakow, a scene displaying what one critic called “the melancholy peripheries of urban life.” Glushakow would begin these works by unobtrusively sitting in his car drawing a study. He’d then bring the study back to his Mt. Washington studio and complete the painting there.

Jacob Glushakow. Razing Calvert Street Station. n.d. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Bequest of J. Blankfard Martenet, 1957, BMA 1993.3

Jacob Glushakow. Razing Calvert Street Station. n.d. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Bequest of J. Blankfard Martenet, 1957, BMA 1993.3

Destruction and renewal take place on a daily basis in Baltimore (as pictured above in Razing Calvert Street Station).  The working harbor of the 20th century was a recurring theme for Glushakow (pictured below in Pier No. 5). He painted its decay before the Harborplace and the condos at Silo Point. The reborn Inner Harbor didn’t interest Glushakow – he always stated that it was more interesting to sketch decaying piers.

Jacob Glushakow. Pier No. 5. 1950. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Bequest of J. Blankfard Martenet, BMA 1957.252

Jacob Glushakow. Pier No. 5. 1950. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Bequest of J. Blankfard Martenet, BMA 1957.252

In addition to the pre-Rouse harbor as his subject matter, many of Glushakow’s paintings depicted the various markets located throughout the city. Below is his 1949 painting Lexington Market, an unmistakable Baltimore scene down to the rowhouses and shopfronts. By concentrating on the people and the streets where they shopped, worked, and lived, Glushakow shows us the potential of the commonplace.

Jacob Glushakow. Lexington Market. 1949. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Bequest of J. Blankfard Martenet, BMA 1957.254

Jacob Glushakow. Lexington Market. 1949. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Bequest of J. Blankfard Martenet, BMA 1957.254

Glushakow died in 2000 at the dawning of the 21st century. Recently, 50 of his paintings were bequeathed to the Maryland Historical Society (MHS). For those wanting to see a large group of his paintings, many are on view at MHS in the exhibition Images of a Vanished Baltimore: The Art of Jacob Glushakow.

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.