BMA Voices

BMA Voices

BMA Voices is a collection of stories about home, but most importantly they are a collection of stories from you, our guests. The Imagining Home exhibition in the Joseph Education Center is a cross-collection exhibition of objects, sculpture, painting, photography, textiles, and more that highlight the diversity of what the idea of Home can mean to someone. Every Saturday and Sunday, our Gallery Interpreters will be working with the public to identify works in the exhibition that resonate with individuals and their stories. This blog serves as an archived history of those conversations.

Maja

Maja

Eugene and Henry Kupjack
Urban New England Dining Room, 1800 – 1815
1983

I moved around a lot when I was younger, so home was always a thought, emotion, or a memory. Not having the physical space made me reflect internally, constantly dreaming about that perfect dream home. A dog, named Scooter, white picket fence, polished silverware so I could host huge dinner parties, all the good stuff. I guess I wanted to be a princess in a pretty castle all to myself and a very cute dog. Later in life I moved in with my parents and found it hard to just be in one place for so long after moving so much, but in the end I got more than my dog and castle; I got a very beautiful home with an amazing family.

Dave

Dave

Walter Henry Williams
Quick Nap
1952

I’ve lived in a lot of different places across Baltimore, mostly in the same neighborhoods, just a lot of different houses. My favorite part of any house and all Baltimore summers is hanging out on the porch. My homes that hold the fondest memories are the ones that had a good porch. Because of the size, a porch is automatically an intimate space. Gathering here with friends on a beautiful night is like nothing else, seeing all your neighbors doing the same. I’m an artist in Baltimore and very proud to say that I recently became a homeowner. Baltimore is an amazing city where artists can actually do this. I looked for 9 months, it took a really long time and way more disappointment than I was ready for. I knew high on my list of what I was looking for was a good porch. When I moved in, it was the middle of the summer, prime time porch time. It was an amazing feeling to sit out there with my friends knowing everything I went through, the sacrifices, the work, during the last year to make this porch mine.

Melissa

Melissa

Starlee Kline
Issue 10
2010

Last year, I had just gotten kicked out and simultaneously broken up with. That was the end of two relationships. I moved in with my best friend and we filled the void with cooking. It was like the more food got chopped, the less my heart did. I healed through avoidance kind of, because cooking and ignoring my own shortcomings helped everything hurt less. Life moved on, so did I, and things began to change again; I found myself repeating this process except now I don’t have a cutting board or a best friend. Just a boyfriend, a mom and a cat that seemingly feel bad for me.

Jessie

Jessie

Frances Benjamin Johnston
Wye Plantation or Paca House, Queen Anne County, Maryland
1936-1937

Ever since graduating college in 2013, I have lived a nomadic life. I’ve had many jobs and moved 9 times. I spent a lot of time in Sullivan County, NY, about 2 hours northwest of NYC. Sullivan County, while in a beautiful part of the country, has many abandoned homes. Most recently, I have moved to East Baltimore where I have seen similar issues. Blocks and blocks of abandoned row houses. I am new to this community but it is my home now. I have grown to love it more and more as time passes and as I meet more beautiful people. I am originally from the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. I lived there from age 7 to age 22. That was my home. Home is still my parent’s house on the top of the hill. I will always love my home. Now that I’ve lived in many places and seen houses that are boarded up and overgrown, it breaks my heart. What happened? Why has no one moved back? Why did former owners leave? If walls could talk, right? There may be some who know once roamed the walls, but for now, only imagination can tell. I imagine living there. I imagine a family there. I imagine having the funds tho breather life back into the space. Unrealistic, sure, but I’m a dreamer. I hope. I go home to my apartment in East Baltimore, thankful for where I am and I wonder where I shall call home next.

ZakyreeZakyree

Frances Benjamin Johnston
Mills Point, St. Mary’s County, Maryland
1936-1937

There’s something about wide, open, seemingly “empty” spaces that reminds me of where I’m from. Or at least how I thought about my home as a child and the small city I grew up in. Frances Benjamin Johnston’s work “Mills Point” strikes me as the style in which my mother likes to keep your family house – grand and like no one lives there. As if its a show house ready for an open house at anytime. My parents are truly big hearted people but striving towards perfection in a space that’s function is typically associated with comfort, nesting, and relaxation is frustrating, ya know?