Author Archives: Jessica Braiterman

About Jessica Braiterman

Jessica develops family and community programs at the BMA and especially enjoys the ever-popular Free Family Sunday workshop. A native Baltimorean, Jessica loves exploring the colorful city and surrounding woodlands with her young daughter and husband.

Interview with traditional Yoruba carver Lukman Alade Fakeye


Photo of Lukman Alade Fakeye in front of doors carved by his uncle Lamide Olonade Fakeye. Courtesy of Lukman Alade Fakeye.

Born into a famous family of West African master carvers, Lukman Alade Fakeye continues the legacy, creating traditional Yoruba wood carvings. His great grandfather’s Epa Society Mask is on view in the new presentation of the BMA’s African Art collection—one of the most important African collections in the United States.

Lukman recently spoke with museum educator Jessica Braiterman about growing up in his father’s studio and the Epa Ceremonial Mask that represents women’s reproductive and spiritual powers during Epa festivals.

JB: How would have the BMA’s Epa Society Mask by your great-grandfather been used?

LAF: It was a ceremonial mask worn during my great grandfather’s life time. When the time for the Epa festival arrives, the mask would be worn by one of the priests to dance and bless people with prayers. The carving of the mother depicted on the mask was used to acknowledge the important role of women in our community and to pay homage to our ancestors. The mask is always kept in a shrine when not in use for the festival and elders bring offerings for the mask and say prayers.

JB: Tell me about your training as a wood carver? When did you begin to learn wood carving and who taught you?

LAF: I spent my childhood playing with my late father, Akin Fakeye, in his workshop and at the same time studying him and my brothers, Sulaiman and Akeem, who were also working in the studio. As a young kid I didn’t realize that this was part of learning process for me. The more I stayed and played in the studio, the more I absorbed. It was like storing information in a computer memory. I used to play in the studio with abandoned tools and wood with some childhood friends and my father used to tell us stories about his grandfather and his father and other great carvers. All the stories he used to tell us inspired me to learn the family tradition.

Photo of Lukman's father Akin Fakeye. Courtesy of Lukman Alade Fakeye.

Photo of Lukman’s father Akin Fakeye. Courtesy of Lukman Alade Fakeye.

By the time I was 9-12 years old, I would head to the studio around 6 a.m. to sweep and clean the studio before going to school. After school, I would return to the studio to eat and study my father while carving. That was my daily routine as a young boy and I was determined to learn the family tradition. Over time, my father taught me how to use different kinds of carving tools and many other things about traditional Yoruba wood carving.

Photo of Lukman working in his studio. Courtesy of Lukman Alade Fakeye.

Photo of Lukman working in his studio. Courtesy of Lukman Alade Fakeye.

JB: What were some of the hardest things to learn?

LAF: As a beginner every aspect of learning is always hard. During this stage, everything is made by hand, we don’t use machine tools. For me [personally], the hardest thing to learn was to make the base balance on the floor.

JB: What’s it like being part of a prestigious wood carving family? Was there lots of pressure to carry on the family tradition?

LAF: I am very proud to be born into the Fakeye family and be one of the carvers of the Fakeye dynasty. I think there is some pressure to carry on the family tradition, because my brother and I need to take it to the next level and maintain the family legacy and tradition to the fullest.

JB: What piece are you most proud of?

I am very proud of every Fakeye carving, especially my father’s and my uncle Lamidi Fakeye’s work because they are all beautiful masterpieces. A few of my favorites are the 13’ statue of Oduduwa at Obafemi Awolowo University at Ile Ife, Nigeria and the carved doors by my father at the Catholic mission house in Ibadan, Nigeria. As for my work, I am most proud of the 7’ long carved dining table with 6 chairs.

Photo of Lukman's recent hand-carved dining room table and chairs. Courtesy of Lukman Alade Fakeye.

Photo of Lukman’s recent hand-carved dining room table and chairs. Courtesy of Lukman Alade Fakeye.


JB: What are your future aspirations?

LAF: To continue the family legacy and take it to the next level. I want to be able to teach youth and adults around the world about traditional Yoruba wood carving techniques and the Fakeye family history.

I would love to have a Fakeye Museum of Yoruba Art and an institute to teach Yoruba art and the Fakeye dynasty so that the family tradition continues.

The expanded and renovated African galleries debut on Sunday, April 26 during a free day-long celebration, with musical performances, art-making, gallery conversations that highlight the diversity of contemporary and traditional African art, and more. 

Slow Art Day at the BMA

Tomorrow is Slow Art Day, a day that encourages slow, detailed looking at art. You will find that when you spend more time with a work of art, you make discoveries that you would not otherwise experience. My colleague at the BMA Katie Bachler and I came up with some suggestions for exploring art slowly at the museum.

Explore art slowly
Allow yourself to look at only 3-5 works of art during your visit. With those 3-5 works, spend longer time with each work, as if they were old friends you are happy to see, and soak in their energy. As you spend time with each work, allow yourself to notice new details, subtle colors and textures, and even the space around the art.  Being with works of art in this way can be very relaxing. Resist temptations to overthink concepts and ideas and try to spend more time with the sensual qualities in each work of art.

Here are some selected works and some slow ways to enjoy being with them.

American Wing
Find William Picknell’s large painting Paysage (A Winter Day in Brittany) in the American Wing. (A Visitor Services Associate can point you to the central gallery on the east side of the Wing.)

William Lamb Picknell. Paysage (A Winter Day in Brittany). 1881. Oil on canvas. W. Clagett Emory Bequest Fund, in Memory of his Parents, William H. Emory of A and Martha B. Emory. BMA2011.44

William Lamb Picknell. Paysage (A Winter Day in Brittany). 1881. Oil on canvas. W. Clagett Emory Bequest Fund, in Memory of his Parents, William H. Emory of A and Martha B. Emory. BMA 2011.44

As you look at the painting, take a breath. Breathe in for 4 counts and out for 8 counts. Notice the space around the person and the cool, crisp air. Imagine the sound of the horse trotting and the smell of the wet earth.

Take a second breath. Walk closer. Notice the myriad shades of vivid colors hidden in the brown and grey tones. Take a close up photograph of your favorite hidden colors.

Take a third breath. Just be with the painting. Where does your eye go? Where does your mind go?

European Galleries
Once in this contemplative space, head over to the European galleries. Find the still life by Dutch artist Abraham Mignon, Garland of Fruit and Flowers.

Abraham Mignon. Garland of Fruit and Flowers. Late 1660s. Oil on canvas. Gift of William A. Dickey, Jr. BMA1957.32

Abraham Mignon. Garland of Fruit and Flowers. Late 1660s. Oil on canvas. Gift of William A. Dickey, Jr. BMA 1957.32

Notice the fruits and flowers brimming with life as they reach forward, out of the darkness.

Step closer. Imagine hearing the water droplets falling to the ground. Listen closely to hear the fluttering wings of the moths and the sounds of the insects eating away at the foliage.

Take a deep breath. Imagine a time lapse. What will happen in 10 minutes, 11 days, 12 weeks, 13 months, 14 years?

Contemporary Wing
Meander over to the Contemporary Wing. Find the sculpture by John McCracken, Untitled (Light Chromium Yellow Plank).

John McCracken. Untitled (Light Chromium Yellow Plank). 1980. Polyresin and fiberglass on plywood. Fanny B. Thalheimer Memorial Fund. BMA1992.6

John McCracken. Untitled (Light Chromium Yellow Plank). 1980. Polyresin and fiberglass on plywood. Fanny B. Thalheimer Memorial Fund. BMA 1992.6

Breathe in and imagine your body lengthening to the height of the piece.
Breathe out slowly and allow your body to relax. Stand comfortably like this for a little while, taking in the brilliant yellow shaft of sunlight embodied.

Take a few steps to the side of the piece and notice the gentle way it rests against the wall. Take in the subtle grey tones of the shadows that fan softly onto the wall.

Breathe in and step close to the surface of the sculpture. Breathe out and notice your reflection on the surface. Continue observing the surface and notice the space around you also reflected. Stand quietly feeling the space around you and between you and the sculpture.

These are just a few ways that you can explore the BMA slowly. Be sure to sit and relax while at the museum exploring the art. On Slow Art Day, you can also attend our 10 Chairs event. Reflect with 10 scholars on 10 iterations of the humble chair in the BMA’s collection.

Slow Art Day is April 11th, 2015. 10 Chairs is on at the BMA from 2pm-4pm.

The Art of Cleaning and Cleaning as Art


Artist Megan Hildebrandt will kick-off the BMA’s American Wing Reopening Celebration on Sunday, November 23 at 10:00 am with a great Baltimore tradition – step scrubbing. BMA educator Jessica Braiterman caught up with Megan to find out more about the step scrubbing.

JB: How did you get started with your step-scrubbing project?

MH: The project began in the spring of 2008. Local history was very central to my practice at that time, and I had been researching the history of Baltimore, specifically Highlandtown (where I was in residence at Creative Alliance). I came across Aubrey Bodine’s amazing (however staged) photographs of women and children step-scrubbing. Asking some locals about the tradition, they all remembered it as an essential ritual of life, a weekly routine that underscored the importance of community via the front marble stoop. I wondered why I rarely saw anyone scrubbing their steps anymore. The few I did see scrubbing had a lot in common– many of the women wore housedresses and even had their hair in curlers – and maybe had an average age of 60. It was as though the tradition was nearly gone, and these women were the keepers of it. So I began to scrub. Every Saturday Morning.

JB: What are some of the more memorable experiences while scrubbing people’s steps in Baltimore?

MH: I remember how warmly I was greeted by people. I think I caught them off-guard pretty often, offering a service for free. But they did pay me in their own ways. Many would stand outside and offer tips about how to better scrub, what product was best to use on marble (Bonami!), and memories of their brothers and sisters taking turns with the chore. Highlandtown in 2008 was really changing a lot – many Polish families who had lived in those rowhouses for decades, many new immigrants from all over the world who had just moved in, and every color person you can imagine. In this way, I sometimes acted as an introduction to a ritual in their new neighborhood; sometimes as a reminder; sometimes a student; sometimes a teacher. My job changed with every door I knocked on.

JB: Did you gain a new appreciation for cleaning as a result?

MH: The task at  hand of scrubbing was an immediate way to engage my audience. Once I was cleaning their steps, we had something to talk about. I have always appreciated the way labor allows for a fluidity, a sense of being alongside, a closeness. And the repetition involved in scrubbing definitely has echoes in my other artwork.

JB: How has step-scrubbing informed or connected to your other artistic practices?

MH: As I said, repetition and ritual is a main tenant of my work at present. I believe it does trace directly to the Do Your Steps project. Knowing that every Saturday morning, I was going to walk around East Baltimore for two or three hours and scrub steps gave me a wonderful structure in which to work. The same can be said of my autobiographical drawings. After being diagnosed with cancer in 2009, working in grid-like formations became another way of repeating an image, and the scale of the drawings was so large they became performative.

JB: What do you hope for the large-scale scrubbing of the BMA’s front steps on November 23?

MH: I hope it to be a visual code, a somewhat quiet poem of history, a bright spectacle. I hope for it to act as a communal unlocking of tradition – perfect for the 100th anniversary.

You can join Megan on November 23 at 10:00 am for some elbow-greasing fun on the BMA’s front steps. Don your best apron and rubber gloves and join Hildebrandt to scrub the BMA’s front steps. Register ahead of time by emailing the artist at:

Stay for performances, storytelling, art activities and more throughout the whole day at the museum.

The step scrubbing project has been generously sponsored by Faultless Starch/Bon Ami.

Photo credits from left: Courtesy of the artist; Photograph by A. Aubrey Bodine • © Jennifer B. Bodine • Courtesy of

Create a gallery of silhouette portraits – an art activity to try at home.


Portraits are a beloved art form that capture the unique spirit of a person in a moment in time. Many fine portraits will be on view in our beautifully renovated American Wing, reopening November 23.

One form of portraiture is the silhouette. You can make silhouettes of everyone in your family.

You’ll need: black paper, white paper, pencil, scissors, index card or wooden stick (optional)

How to make your silhouette
Choose your model. Sit so you can see their profile, or the side of their body. Practice sketching the shape of their face with white paper so it is easy to see. Start with an oval shape. About halfway down, make the indent for the eyes. (Our brains are so big that they take up about half of the skull!)  After the eye, create the curve of the nose, followed by two lips, and chin. Consider adding a fun hair style, a great hat, or a bold collar to show the personality of your sitter in the silhouette.

After practicing on white paper to get the shape you like best, redraw it on black paper and cut it out with scissors. You can glue this to your favorite paper and frame it. You could also glue it to a wooden stick and make a puppet.

Create a gallery of silhouette portraits—or make a shadow puppet show with silhouettes on wooden sticks!

Meet silhouette artist Alex Vernon at the BMA’s American Wing Reopening Celebration on November 23. He’ll be creating custom silhouettes for visitors to take home.
Images courtesy of Alex Vernon

At the intersection of art and mathematics


Photograph of Olafur Eliasson's Flower observatory courtesy Christopher Hartman, July 2014.

Photograph of Olafur Eliasson’s Flower observatory, 2004 courtesy Christopher Hartman, July 2014.

Mathematics and art at first seem worlds apart. But is it so? Might there be a relationship between these disciplines? And if so, can it be explored in the BMA’s collection? Are there works of art at the Museum that draw on mathematical ideas, processes, and overlapping notions of beauty?

A stroll through the BMA’s Contemporary Wing invites pause as I – do I dare – walk on top of Carl Andre’s Zinc-Magnesium Plain, 1969. I look down and take in the textures of the metal surfaces. I think about the shape of the squares and their imperfect alignment and how the grid that this zinc and magnesium surface represents extends out infinitely in all directions.

I look up and see an explosion of geometric shapes—this time in brilliant stainless steel. Olafur Eliasson’s Flower observatory 2004 bursts forth and lures a viewer inside and around the hulking form.  It is quite a complex structure. Each triangular spike that pierces the gallery air has curious openings of various sizes where the tips would be. I stretch up and try to see through them like tiny keyholes and spy intricate forms. I cross the threshold, feel the shadow of the large form darken the space and look up. It is a dazzling canopy of star-like shapes as if a new universe is unfolding. I am inside the observatory, observing, marvelling. I don’t rush this moment; the marvel has its pleasures.

As the wonder subsides, I catch myself thinking about shapes—the glittering diamonds and flower-like forms, the rhombuses, the pentagon that inscribes the invisible base of the sculpture, the hex screws that connect the steel planes. I wonder if this is what a mathematical imagination might feel and look like.

To try to understand these questions and ideas, I invited mathematician Susan Goldstine and architect Fred Scharmen to the Museum for a conversation about the intersection of mathematics and art in these pieces. Fred uses words like “striking and beautiful” to describe geometry and art.  Susan poignantly said that “the beauty of mathematics – and the mathematics of beauty – comes from the ways in which simple elements combine and intersect to form dazzling structures seemingly out of thin air.”

As soon as Susan walked under Flower observatory, she said that it was based on a rhombic triacontahedron – a convex polyhedron with 30 rhombic faces. I’d remembered reading that in my research but couldn’t see it. She helpfully explained it to me and offered to show me how to fold the shape with paper, so that I could understand it with my hands as well as with my mind’s eye.

This conversation about the relationship between art and mathematics will form the basis of the next Big Table Connections. Both Fred and Susan have a natural, deep connection to mathematical forms, and they will bring their knowledge to the BMA on Saturday August 2nd at 2 pm. We will also get the chance to fold rhombic triacontahedra and make mathematical drawings too. I hope you will join us! You can also join in the conversation online using the #BMABigTable hashtag on Twitter.

In the meantime, be sure to visit the Sondheim semi-finalist exhibition at MICA to see Fred’s large wall drawing inspired by his mathematical research. The exhibition is on view in the Decker, Meyerhoff, and Pinkard galleries at MICA through August 3rd.

Light Play–Musing on Dan Flavin’s Untitled (To Barnett Newman for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”)

Visitors observing Dan Flavin’s Untitled (To Barnett Newman for "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf").

Visitors observing Dan Flavin’s Untitled (To Barnett Newman for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”).

The tower of fluorescent lights looms large at a tight triangular junction where the old building meets the new. On a quiet day at the museum, you can literally hear it hum.

Flavin’s signature use of ordinary fluorescent tubes gives the work both a straightforward familiarity and a strange magic. Up close, you can see the screws, the wires, the ordinariness of the fixtures. But stay a while—the colors start to work on your eyes. The red, yellow, and blue bulbs mix—sunset raspberry and a delicate melon sorbet splash on the walls. The entire room is noticeably flooded with a lavender glow.

The sensory experience beckons. I slowly look up and linger longer than usual on the exit sign which glows a gorgeous green. I look left and notice a dramatic yellow cast in the adjacent gallery which my intellect knows is a crisp white. My eyes have shifted. The world has become a complex tapestry of colored light. Experiencing Flavin’s piece is also about following the light out into the space occupied by the light. It is expansive and also quite mysterious.

One of the pleasures of sitting with light art is all the questions surrounding light—how does Flavin’s skillful work with light seduce the senses and alter one’s perception? What is causing my eyes to see a white room as yellow? Why does colored light create such suggestive moods and alter the character of space?

It is these questions and more that we’ll explore in the BMA’s Big Table Connections program on Saturday July 5, when light artist and lighting designer Glenn Shrum joins us for a session on Dan Flavin’s piece and the inner workings of light.

Shrum is the owner and founder of Flux Studio. He is an active member of the international lighting design and lighting education community and Assistant Professor of Lighting Design at Parsons The New School for Design. We invited him to lead a session of the BMA’s Big Table Connections program. Thankfully, Glenn very generously agreed. In June, he came to the museum for a fascinating planning session and developed a clever in-gallery project with his colored light tables. Participants will get to try their hand at color mixing with light. How might you mix light and reshape space. What marvelous effects will you generate? Be sure to bring your cameras or devices to document your experiments.

What do you think? Have you experienced Flavin’s work? How did it impact your senses? What other special experiences with light have you had?

The BMA’s Big Table Connections program is a great opportunity to unpack complex ideas in contemporary art from multiple perspectives. This year we have been presenting sessions on Minimalism and its offshoots. We could not finish the season in August without looking closely at the work of Dan Flavin in our Contemporary Wing.

Join us on Saturday, July 5 at 2 p.m., to hear Glenn discuss light art and lighting design, and provide valuable context for Flavin’s work. After Glenn’s talk, we’ll move into the galleries and try our hand at mixing colored light. Hope to see you there!