Author Archives: Anita Jones

About Anita Jones

Anita Jones is Curator of Textiles at the BMA.

Like Mother, Like Daughter: Elizabeth Stouffer Garrett & Elizabeth Barbara Garrett Quilts

Elizabeth Stouffer. "Tree of Life”. 1809. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of William L. Reed, Lutherville, Maryland, in Memory of Barbara Garrett Reed, BMA 1982.140

Elizabeth Stouffer. “Tree of Life”. 1809. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of William L. Reed, Lutherville, Maryland, in Memory of Barbara Garrett Reed, BMA 1982.140

Tradition holds that girls of the 19th century and earlier often created a collection of quilts prior to their marriage. The Archives at the BMA offers some evidence of this claim in the papers of early quilt scholar William Rush Dunton, Jr. Dunton’s notebooks include photographs and written records of quilts by Elizabeth Stouffer of Baltimore and her daughter Elizabeth Barbara Garrett, which seem to support the conclusion that this did occur in some instances. Quilts recently given to the Museum by members of the Garrett family offer material proof as well.

Elizabeth Stouffer of Baltimore (1791-1877) created this Tree of Life Chintz Appliqué Quilt, given to the BMA in 1980. This quilt combines several major stylistic trends in early American quilting. Within a central medallion format framed by several borders, Stouffer composed a flowering Tree of Life cut from various printed fabrics and appliquéd to the white cotton background. Such chintz appliquéd quilts were popular during the first half of the 19th century. Their designs recalled painted and printed cotton bedcovers from India called palampores, which were often decorated with a central flowering tree.  In the background and borders, elaborate stuffed and corded work depicts oak leaves, exotic flowers, thistles, and pineapples. After making her quilt, Elizabeth Stouffer took the extra step of initialing and dating it on the reverse in cross-stitch, and added the number “7” indicating that it was the seventh in a series of quilts she had made.

In 1817, eight years after finishing her 7th quilt, Elizabeth married Robert Garrett, founder of the banking house of Robert Garrett and Sons. Among their four children was a single daughter, Elizabeth Barbara Garrett (1827-1917). This Diamond in Square on Point Quilt, donated to the Museum by Edith and James Garrett in 2012 bears her initials, the date 1835, and a “1” on the reverse, indicating that like her mother, Barbara Garrett acquired (and most likely made) a series of quilts.  Although, she would have been only 8 years of age in 1835, it is likely that Barbara had a part in creating this quilt.

Elizabeth Barbara Garrett. "Diamond in Square on Point" Quilt. 1835. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of James and Edith Hoyt Garrett, Baltimore, BMA 2012.227

Elizabeth Barbara Garrett. “Diamond in Square on Point” Quilt. 1835. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of James and Edith Hoyt Garrett, Baltimore, BMA 2012.227

Young girls learned sewing and embroidery at a very early age in early 19th century America.  Even an eight-year-old could cut the fabric sections and sew the straight lines required in piecing the simple Diamond in Star pattern. Examination shows that the quilting is very good at 14 stitches per inch (as opposed to 20 stitches per inch in the Tree of Life Quilt), but the quilted diagonal lines often go off course and are “corrected” by starting over again a short distance from the previous stitch. Likewise, the clamshell pattern quilting in the border becomes less regular as it continues and is finally abandoned in favor of an easier pattern of straight lines. Observations such as these may indicate a young, less experienced seamstress, supervised by someone with more skill. Even so, Barbara Garrett’s quilt was fashionable for her time, which preferred the block structure over the central medallion seen in her mother’s quilt. It also contained many beautiful fabrics, available to her due to the prominence of her family in Baltimore’s mercantile and banking businesses and the city’s thriving trade.

Fabrics in Elizabeth Barbara Garrett's quilt.

Fabrics in Elizabeth Barbara Garrett’s quilt.

The Dunton collection in the Archives at the BMA records two more quilts by Elizabeth Barbara Garrett: a Nine Patch Variation Quilt with sashing and a glazed chintz border marked on the reverse with cross stitch, “EB.G/1836/2”1; and a Checkerboard quilt with 2-1/2″ blocks and a wide glazed chintz border marked on the reverse with cross stitch, “EB .G/1839/5”2.

Detail, Nine Patch Variation with Squares on Point in Grid Quilt, Maker: Elizabeth Barbara Garrett, 1836, American, Maryland, Baltimore Cotton, Gift of Mrs. Robert Garrett, New York, BMA 2015.126

Detail, Nine Patch Variation with Squares on Point in Grid Quilt, Maker: Elizabeth Barbara Garrett, 1836, American, Maryland, Baltimore Cotton, Gift of Mrs. Robert Garrett, New York, BMA 2015.126

Detail, Checkerboard Quilt with Chintz Border, Maker: Elizabeth Barbara Garrett, 1839, Cotton, American, Maryland, Baltimore, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Garrett, Santa Rosa, California, BMA 2015.127

Detail, Checkerboard Quilt with Chintz Border, Maker: Elizabeth Barbara Garrett, 1839, Cotton, American, Maryland, Baltimore, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Garrett, Santa Rosa, California, BMA 2015.127

These quilts have descended in the family until recently, when they were donated to the BMA from Garrett family members, thus providing a material record to match the archival evidence of a young Baltimore girl following a family tradition of industry and creativity in developing a cache of home-made quilts for use in her future household.

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1 Recorded in Dunton, Vol.VI, pp. 66-67, illus.
2 Recorded in Dunton, Vol.VI, pp. 68-69.

An evolution in embroidery

Abraham Banishing Hagar and Ishmael. c. 1650. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchase with exchange funds from Gift of Mrs. A. Taylor Bragonier; Gift of Mrs. H.P. Bray; Gift of Mrs. Charles Collier; Gift of Mrs. Symington Dorsey; Gift of Mrs. J. Edward Duker; Gift of Maria Lovell Eaton and Mrs. Charles R. Weld, from the Estate of Mary M. Eaton; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel L. Hendler; Gift of Mrs. Gerald W. Johnson; Gift of Mrs. F.A. Korff; Gift of Ruth Young Lachman; Gift of Eleanor B. Leitch; Gift of Sara B. Lipscomb; Gift of Cornelius Ruxton Love, Jr.; Gift of Henry A. Ludwig; Gift of Fanny Lyon; Gift of Mrs. Florence Milliken; Gift of Mrs. Frank Primrose; Gift of Mrs. Jesse Rider; Gift of Mrs. Ralph K. Robertson; Gift of Mrs. C. Rogulih; Gift of Mrs. Dudley Shoemaker; and Gift of Louisa Gilmore Riach Wade, BMA 1998.528

Abraham Banishing Hagar and Ishmael. c. 1650. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchase with exchange funds from Gift of Mrs. A. Taylor Bragonier; Gift of Mrs. H.P. Bray; Gift of Mrs. Charles Collier; Gift of Mrs. Symington Dorsey; Gift of Mrs. J. Edward Duker; Gift of Maria Lovell Eaton and Mrs. Charles R. Weld, from the Estate of Mary M. Eaton; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel L. Hendler; Gift of Mrs. Gerald W. Johnson; Gift of Mrs. F.A. Korff; Gift of Ruth Young Lachman; Gift of Eleanor B. Leitch; Gift of Sara B. Lipscomb; Gift of Cornelius Ruxton Love, Jr.; Gift of Henry A. Ludwig; Gift of Fanny Lyon; Gift of Mrs. Florence Milliken; Gift of Mrs. Frank Primrose; Gift of Mrs. Jesse Rider; Gift of Mrs. Ralph K. Robertson; Gift of Mrs. C. Rogulih; Gift of Mrs. Dudley Shoemaker; and Gift of Louisa Gilmore Riach Wade, BMA 1998.528

From the Renaissance through the early 19th century and beyond, young women of high social position in England were well schooled in the needle arts. From a very young age they began making marking samplers—stitching simple letters in cross stitch on linen–progressing to increasingly elaborate work as they aged. With large houses to furnish, high born women often turned their embroidery skills toward the production of domestic articles such as book covers, pillows, boxes, and cushions. Biblical stories frequently provided the subject matter for these endeavors. This cushion cover, a rare surviving example of exceptional quality and condition from the 17th century, features the story of Abraham banishing his son Ishmael along with his mother Hagar.

Hagar, the handmaiden of Abraham’s seemingly barren wife Sarah, bore Abraham a son, Ishmael, as Sarah’s proxy. After Sarah herself gave birth to a son, Isaac, she required that Abraham send Hagar and Ishmael away in order to secure her son’s position as Abraham’s sole heir. The needlework portrays Abraham bidding farewell to Hagar and Ishmael as Sarah and Isaac look on from a tent. In a secondary scene Hagar and Ishmael are about to perish from thirst when an angel appears to show her a source of water and promise deliverance.

The design of the cushion cover was derived from a printed source–an engraving in Gerard de Jode’s Thesaurus Sacrarum Historiarum Veteris Testamenti published in Antwerp in 1585. While the subject is disturbing, the addition of numerous plants and animals in the background, rendered with characteristic disregard to scale, creates a naïve, whimsical landscape that belies the dark nature of the story. The excellence of this embroidery is shown in the exquisite fineness of the tent stitching, the skill exhibited in the use of multicolored silk threads for shading, and the fluidity of line achieved.  The original silver and gold metallic bobbin lace provides an elegant and expensive finish.

Artist unknown. Needlework Picture: The Sacrifice of Isaac. Early 19th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Textile Acquisition Fund, BMA 2009.140

Artist unknown. Needlework Picture: The Sacrifice of Isaac. Early 19th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Textile Acquisition Fund, BMA 2009.140

Abraham and his son Isaac were also the subject of girlhood embroideries in the late 18th and early 19th century as seen in this excellent example, “The Sacrifice of Isaac,” which is also probably English. Characteristic of these fashionable silk pictures, this example was worked in silk threads on a silk ground with painted hands, faces, and background. Here, Abraham is commanded by God to sacrifice his beloved son Isaac as a burnt offering. He prepares to do so, but is prevented at the last minute by an angel, who tells him that God has relented and Isaac may live.

This beautifully conceived, expertly painted, and expertly embroidered scene may have been drafted by a professional artist for the embroiderer. The needlework in this piece shows a variety of stitches and materials used to achieve textural diversity: straight stitches in silk threads used to present the costume of Abraham with fringe, knotted stitches in silk depict the tress, and stitches in wool render the ram’s wooly fleece.

Comparing the two embroideries reveals great contrast between 17th and early 19th century norms. One shows an unrealistic landscape crowded with flora and fauna in varying scale, with characters dressed in contemporary garb and no interest in realism; the other portrays a realistic landscape with emphasis on the individuals, the action, and the detail of the costume.

Embroidery of such scenes provided an opportunity to teach moral precepts to young women along with needle skills. One wonders, however, what moral or message the embroiderer took from these stories. Did she feel the injustice of Hagar’s position? Did she find Abraham’s decision to favor Isaac over Ishmael and expel him into the wilderness cruel? Did she believe Sarah’s ruthless demands against Hagar and Ishmael were justified because they were made in defense of her own son’s interests? Was she shocked at the intention of Abraham to kill his own son? If she were faced in the future with the choice of protecting her child or her husband, which would she choose? How well equipped were the young women stitching these stories to put them into a context that would prove meaningful to their own lives?

 

Another famous race horse: Iroquois

Maker: Attributed to Kate Mattingly Edwards.Crazy Quilt with Peacock Medallion (detail). 1881-1889.

Maker: Attributed to Kate Mattingly Edwards.Crazy Quilt with Peacock Medallion (detail). 1881-1889.

American Pharaoh has won the Triple Crown of American horse racing—the first thoroughbred to do so in 37 years. His name will be remembered alongside that of Secretariat, Affirmed, and other great horses. However, he will not be commemorated in a Stevengraph.

Stevengraphs were woven silk pictures made during the later decades of the 19th century at the firm of Thomas Stevens in Coventry, England. Stevens was a ribbon manufacturer, who faced possible bankruptcy when fashion dictated that feathers rather than ribbons were the proper trim for ladies’ hats. To avoid this fate, Stevens turned his looms to producing woven bookmarks and small pictures in silk. These depicted famous people and events, including the winning of the Epsom Derby in 1881 by Iroquois, an American bred horse. Iroquois and his jockey Fred Archer continued on to win the St. Leger, the second of three races in the English Triple Crown. Despite a second place showing in the first of the three races (the 2,000 Guineas), the horse and jockey enjoyed fame both in England and America. Iroquois’ reputation even boosted attendance at American racetracks. Perhaps that is why Kate Mattingly Edwards of West Virginia had a Stevengraph depicting Iroquois and included it in her elaborate crazy quilt, which is currently on exhibition in the Jean and Allan Berman Textile Gallery at the BMA.

Maker: Attributed to Kate Mattingly Edwards.Crazy Quilt with Peacock Medallion. 1881-1889. Silk, including velvet, ribbons, and Stevengraph; silk embroidery threads, cotton lining Origin: West Virginia, United States. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Mrs. A. Taylor Bragonier. BMA 1956.201

Maker: Attributed to Kate Mattingly Edwards.Crazy Quilt with Peacock Medallion. 1881-1889.
Silk, including velvet, ribbons, and Stevengraph; silk embroidery threads, cotton lining
Origin: West Virginia, United States. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Mrs. A. Taylor Bragonier. BMA 1956.201

BMA Voices: The narrative of needlepoint

Abraham Banishing Hagar and Ishmael. c. 1650. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchase with exchange funds from Gift of Mrs. A. Taylor Bragonier; Gift of Mrs. H.P. Bray; Gift of Mrs. Charles Collier; Gift of Mrs. Symington Dorsey; Gift of Mrs. J. Edward Duker; Gift of Maria Lovell Eaton and Mrs. Charles R. Weld, from the Estate of Mary M. Eaton; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel L. Hendler; Gift of Mrs. Gerald W. Johnson; Gift of Mrs. F.A. Korff; Gift of Ruth Young Lachman; Gift of Eleanor B. Leitch; Gift of Sara B. Lipscomb; Gift of Cornelius Ruxton Love, Jr.; Gift of Henry A. Ludwig; Gift of Fanny Lyon; Gift of Mrs. Florence Milliken; Gift of Mrs. Frank Primrose; Gift of Mrs. Jesse Rider; Gift of Mrs. Ralph K. Robertson; Gift of Mrs. C. Rogulih; Gift of Mrs. Dudley Shoemaker; and Gift of Louisa Gilmore Riach Wade, BMA 1998.528

Abraham Banishing Hagar and Ishmael. c. 1650. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchase with exchange funds from Gift of Mrs. A. Taylor Bragonier; Gift of Mrs. H.P. Bray; Gift of Mrs. Charles Collier; Gift of Mrs. Symington Dorsey; Gift of Mrs. J. Edward Duker; Gift of Maria Lovell Eaton and Mrs. Charles R. Weld, from the Estate of Mary M. Eaton; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel L. Hendler; Gift of Mrs. Gerald W. Johnson; Gift of Mrs. F.A. Korff; Gift of Ruth Young Lachman; Gift of Eleanor B. Leitch; Gift of Sara B. Lipscomb; Gift of Cornelius Ruxton Love, Jr.; Gift of Henry A. Ludwig; Gift of Fanny Lyon; Gift of Mrs. Florence Milliken; Gift of Mrs. Frank Primrose; Gift of Mrs. Jesse Rider; Gift of Mrs. Ralph K. Robertson; Gift of Mrs. C. Rogulih; Gift of Mrs. Dudley Shoemaker; and Gift of Louisa Gilmore Riach Wade, BMA 1998.528

Anita Jones, Curator of Textiles, discusses a needlework pillowcover that ignores the restraints of time and space to tell its story. This piece was modelled after Abraham Banishing Hagar and Ishmael. Engraving from Gerard de Jode, Thesaurus Sacrarum Historiarum Veteris Testamenti*, Antwerp, 1585. View the Thesaurus on at The British Museum. The original is located at the New York Public Library.

Abraham Banishes Hagar and Ishmael. Engraving from Gerard de Jode, Thesaurus Sacrarum Historiarum Veteris Testamenti*, Antwerp, 1585.

Abraham Banishes Hagar and Ishmael. Engraving from Gerard de Jode, Thesaurus Sacrarum Historiarum Veteris Testamenti*, Antwerp, 1585.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a good example of a similar piece.

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

BMA Voices: A kimono six months in the making

Kimono Furisode 1912-1989, Taisho (1912-1926) or Showa (1926-1989) Japan. Gift of Mrs. D.M. Cheston, Baltimore 1990.113

Kimono Furisode 1912-1989, Taisho (1912-1926) or Showa (1926-1989). Japan. Gift of Mrs. D.M. Cheston, Baltimore 1990.113

Kimono Furisode 1912-1989, Taisho (1912-1926) or Showa (1926-1989) Japan. Gift of Mrs. D.M. Cheston, Baltimore 1990.113

Kimono Furisode 1912-1989, Taisho (1912-1926) or Showa (1926-1989) Japan. Gift of Mrs. D.M. Cheston, Baltimore
1990.113

Anita Jones, Curator of Textiles

The incredible skill and significant time that people from various cultures devote to the production of special textiles is a continuing source of amazement to me. This superb furisode, a kimono intended for a Japanese bride to wear at her wedding reception, is an illustrative example.

The ground fabric is a woven silk damask-like weave (rinzu) with the swastika or sayagata pattern – an ancient Buddhist symbol of longevity – along with wild orchid (ran), chrysanthemum (kiku), and bamboo motifs. This elaborately woven ground is almost overlooked with the addition of colorful surface patterns. The most prominent of these, known as “scattered fans” (semmen-chirashi), is composed of diverse multicolored, floral, and geometric motifs adopted from traditional Japanese textile designs.

kimono2 These designs are hand-painted using the yuzen-zome technique. The motifs were first drawn on the fabric in spiderwort juice – a fugitive or temporary blue dye. The yuzen artist then carefully covers the lines with a starch paste resist, sometimes on both sides of the fabric. Soybean extract (gojiru) was brushed over the fabric to stabilize both the paste and the dye which was then painted on with a brush. The resist prevented the colors from bleeding into one another. Next, the fabric was steamed to set the dyes and the resist paste was washed off. Afterward, gold and silver metallic paint would be added to complete some designs and to cover the white outlines left from the resist.

A secondary pattern “vertical seething with clouds” (Kumo-tatewaku), referring to the constant movement of clouds, was created by the application of silver and gold leaf to the surface of the silk. This same motif is also found on the robe’s red silk lining along the hem and on the edges of the lower half of the kimono opening.

kimonoAfter all the dyes and pigments were finished, embroidery was added in the form of multiple colored ribbons of silk floss that float across the open areas and weave through the slats of the fans forming tied bows on either side. Finally, metallic threads were couched down outlining and emphasizing the edges of motifs.

This kimono was the product of an organized workshop, with each process performed by a specialist. It probably took six months to complete. Considering that it would have been worn for only one occasion, the care and effort spent on this richly ornamented garment is phenomenal.

I would like to thank Japanese textile specialists Ann Marie Moeller and Ed Lagan for much of the information provided in this article.

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

BMA Voices: Who is the lady in this embroidery?

After William Hamilton. The Lady as Shepherdess. 1790 1820. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Dorothy McIlvain Scott Collection, BMA 2012.452

After William Hamilton. The Lady as Shepherdess. 1790-1820. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Dorothy McIlvain Scott Collection, BMA 2012.452

Who is the lady in this embroidery? Anita Jones, Curator of Textiles, shares the mystery behind this skillfully-created work of art. 

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.

BMA Voices: How can lace details indicate status and rank?

Milanese Bobbin Lace Flounce for an Alb. Late 17th early-18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

Milanese Bobbin Lace, Flounce for an Alb (detail). Late 17th-early 18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

Anita Jones, Curator of Decorative Arts for Textiles

In earlier centuries, lace was more than a frilly trim or symbol of feminine seduction. Men wore lace as a sign of status and rank in the Church, as well as in court circles. The need for lace decoration on altar covers, ritual cloths, and liturgical vestments made the Church a major patron of lace-making.

This lace flounce once graced the bottom of an ecclesiastic robe called an alb. It is a continuous band of Milanese bobbin lace over 16 inches high and 144 inches in circumference. In this type of bobbin lace, the cloth work (solid areas) and the ground (net) are made separately, thus allowing the work required to produce such large-scale items to be divided into manageable sections.

Milanese Bobbin Lace Flounce for an Alb. Late 17th early-18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

Milanese Bobbin Lace, Flounce for an Alb (detail). Late 17th-early 18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

While scrolls and flowers are typical of Milanese lace, sections of this flounce indicate a special commission for a churchman of some status. On one side, the lace makers recreated a dramatic version of The Vision of St. Paul, depicting the moment in which Saul, a persecutor of Christians, has a vision of the risen Christ. The experience results in his conversion to Christianity and eventual martyrdom as Paul.

Despite the lack of color in the lace, the details of clothing, faces, horses, bridles and other elements are discernible through the use of different stitches. This powerful representation of faith may also have had a personal connection to the clergyman wearing it.

Milanese Bobbin Lace Flounce for an Alb. Late 17th early-18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

Milanese Bobbin Lace, Flounce for an Alb (detail). Late 17th-early 18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

The other side of this flounce reveals an elaborate coat of arms, a privilege shared by the aristocracy and the Church. Coats of arms are not infrequent in Milanese laces, but required special designs and resulted in increased cost. Unfortunately, the identity of the owner remains a mystery. Claribel and Etta Cone, who purchased the alb flounce in Paris in 1926, believed the arms to be those of a Cardinal. However, according to the rules of ecclesiastical heraldry, 12 tassels (fiocchi) on each side of the hat (galero) and of a different color than the hat (indicated here by the use of different stitches) indicate a cleric of a different rank. Other secular motifs, such as the crowned eagle, signifying imperial power, and the lion passant (walking), associated with royalty, seem to indicate a connection to a powerful family, who might have sought to cement their social and political status by positioning one of their members in the Church hierarchy.

Milanese Bobbin Lace Flounce for an Alb. Late 17th early-18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

Milanese Bobbin Lace, Flounce for an Alb. Late 17th-early 18th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA Sheet 26

BMA Voices is an insider’s exploration of The Baltimore Museum of Art collection through the eyes of its curators, conservators, and registrars. Featuring a new object every day during the BMA’s 100 Day Celebration, the project will highlight some favorite, amusing, unusual, and obscure objects.