Exhibit 3: Verso of Renoir’s On the Shore of the Seine

Detail of verso of "On the Shore of the Seine" by Pierre Auguste Renoir, c. 1879. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Saidie A. May Bequest, Courtesy of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, BMA 2014.1

Detail of verso of “On the Shore of the Seine” by Pierre Auguste Renoir, c. 1879. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Saidie A. May Bequest, Courtesy of the Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company, BMA 2014.1

 

By Julia Fountain

The thieves will get their money, just as they always do. The police want to protect the people, but not the artist, nor their art.
135 years later pieces will hang on the cluttered walls of museums, boasting names of the histories renowned artists. Millions of eyes will trace the various strokes and contours, but little do they know that beneath the varnish and oil may simply be a rendition, a mere copy of an original.
The art is still being appreciated, the legacy sustained; no one got hurt.

Continue the story…

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

4 thoughts on “Exhibit 3: Verso of Renoir’s On the Shore of the Seine

  1. Pingback: Exhibit 2: Three Saints | BMA Blog

  2. Jan Ryan

    People collect anything: stolen art, known forgeries, John Wayne Gacy clown paintings. There would be a buyer.

    A quote from the police commissioner, “We are doing everything in our power blah blah blah.” Is he kidding? The building stands, paintings on the walls. All the thieves wanted was money, anonymity and immunity. No one needs to get hurt. Buy the damn painting back.

    And then the name was there in print, the most likely buyer they had ever read about.

    Vote(2)
    Reply
  3. Julia Fountain

    The thieves will get their money, just as they always do. The police want to protect the people, but not the artist, nor their art.
    135 years later pieces will hang on the cluttered walls of museums, boasting names of the histories renowned artists. Millions of eyes will trace the various strokes and contours, but little do they know that beneath the varnish and oil may simply be a rendition, a mere copy of an original.
    The art is still being appreciated, the legacy sustain; no one got hurt.

    Vote(3)
    Reply
  4. Pingback: Contours of a Thief, the final pages… |

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>