The lasting impact of the Baltimore City and Baltimore County Public Schools Student Art Exhibition

Every year, the Baltimore Museum of Art teams up with schools around the area to highlight the talented young artists this city has to offer.

Every spring, the BMA hosts the Baltimore City and Baltimore County Public Schools Student Art Exhibitions with work from Baltimore students of all ages. Elementary students on up to seniors in high school are given the special opportunity to have their work displayed in a real art museum.

During my senior year, I was personally chosen to have one of my works showcased in the exhibition, just as I was starting to seriously think about my future and who I wanted to be in college and beyond. Four years later, I’m now an intern at the BMA and about to graduate from Towson University with an Art and Design Major and an Art History minor. I paint every opportunity I can and love being an artist.

I wasn’t, however, always so sure about which direction I wanted my life to head towards. I was always drawn to art and painting but never had the confidence in myself that I could make a career out of it. Having my painting chosen to be in a real exhibition at a respected art museum really helped boost my self-esteem and let me envision myself as a working artist. For one of the first times, I truly believed in myself and my ability to paint. I know through my own experience and struggles that this is such an important and vital feeling for a young student to have. This show is particularly special because kids of all ages and teenagers can seriously struggle with their self-image and identity.

Even if a student doesn’t decide to continue with art, gaining confidence in their skills and being able to proudly display their work has long-term benefits. According to the National Endowment for the Arts, studies have shown that students who have early and consistent access to the arts perform better academically and have better workforce opportunities. This is especially true for at-risk youth from a low socioeconomic background.

I’m so happy to be able to intern at a museum that realizes the importance art has on the lives of children and chooses every year to show them their work is just as significant and beautiful as any other piece of art in the museum.

Years after having my own art displayed in this exhibition, I have grown significantly as an artist and a painter and have chosen to pursue a career working in art museums. I’m excited to work at institutions that are committed to bringing art and education to the community around them, and the BMA is a great model for this commitment. The Baltimore City and Baltimore County Public Schools Student Art Exhibition is just one example of this commitment that personally had a significant impact on me. There is no doubt in my mind that this year it will also have an impact on another young student and hopefully inspire them to find their place in the art world.

Here is the painting that started it all from the 2014 BMA student show:

“Pulling My Hair Out.” 24in x 30in. Oil on canvas.

Here’s what I’ve been up to as a senior in college studying art:

“Caer Iborneith.” 30in x 40 in. Oil on canvas.

“marked by periods of great excitement, euphoria, delusions, or overactivity.” 30in x 40in. Oil and mixed media on canvas.

fyi…For Your Inspiration: Baltimore City Public Schools Art Exhibition, now in its eleventh year, will feature artwork by 400 students from 90 Baltimore City public schools from May 9-May 13, 2018.

The annual countywide student exhibition, Art is for Everyone: Baltimore County Public Schools Art Exhibition, runs from May 16-May 20, 2018.

More details on both exhibitions.

Behind the Dust: Conservation of a Gitenga Mask

When the Gitenga Mask (Fig. 1 and 2) came to the conservation lab for treatment it caused great excitement.  It was impressive in size at 33 ½ x 35 ½ x 19 inches, and had great presence.

Fig 1 and 2 Before Treatment. Photos of the Gitenga Mask by Senior Photographer Mitro Hood.

As one took a closer look it became apparent that the majority of the feathers, especially in the back, were deformed and covered in layers of dust (Fig. 3 and 4) and insect remains. Some feathers were bent, broken, and in many cases the “tip” (rachis and barbs) was missing especially around the base on the back and left-hand side. It was a very intimidating treatment prospect and one that would take hundreds of hours to complete. When the exhibition date was set for the fall of 2017, there was no turning back.

Fig 3 and Fig 4 Lab photographs showing the dust and deformed feathers.

Below are some of the interesting discoveries that emerged before and during the conservation treatment of this remarkable object.

The slow removal of the dust on the back of the mask revealed layers of striking blue feathers as seen in the lab photograph taken during treatment (Fig. 5). Kevin Tervala, Associate Curator of African Art, researched the various birds that exist in the Pende region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where the mask originates, and discovered that the feathers are from the Great Blue Turaco Bird (Fig. 6).

Fig 5 A lab photograph of the back of the Gitenga Mask during treatment.

Fig 6 A Great Blue Turaco Bird.

The clever way the feathers were attached to the mask during its construction is illustrated in the photograph below. The feather “base” (calamus or hollow shaft) was bent and inserted into a woven twine support (Fig. 7). A second piece of twine was passed through the bent bases of several feathers to create a “string” of feathers. The “strings” of feathers were then sewn onto the fabric head cap in layers (Fig. 8).

Fig 7 and 8 Interior photographs illustrating how the strings of feathers were attached to the head cap.

The beautiful neckline of the mask and a section of the back (Fig. 9 and 10) also illustrates the method in which the feathers are secured to the head cap. Notice all the missing feather “tips!”

Fig 9 and 10 Lab photographs of the neckline and a back section of the mask before treatment.

Fig 11 Preening the feathers one at a time.

Fig 12 and 13 After Treatment. Photos of the Gitenga Mask by Senior Photographer Mitro Hood.

One of the most satisfying discoveries a conservator can make is finding old repairs. In this case I wasn’t disappointed. Someone had carefully taken the top (vane) of a broken feather and adhered it to the remaining base (calamus or hollow shaft) of another broken feather that was missing its tip (rachis and barbs). So, this was not the first conservation treatment campaign for the mask, and will certainly not be the last.

Please note that in the case of ethnographic works with organic parts, it’s important to determine if there’s any evidence the piece has been treated with pesticides, some of which containe heavy metals (e.g. mercury) which can pose health risks. This was done in good faith by museums and collectors in the past to try and stop insect infestations.  In the case of this mask, there was no visual evidence of pesticide use. We are fortunate at the BMA to have a handheld Bruker X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (XRF), which can detect heavy metals. The XRF readings at the various sampling locations supported the visual observation that there were no heavy metals present.

A conservation treatment like the one of this Gitenga mask involves more than just the objects conservator. Shannen Hill, former BMA Associate Curator of African Art, encouraged me to take this treatment on and Kevin Tervala, BMA Associate Curator of African Art, encouraged me to finish it. Local objects conservators Angie Elliot, Diane Fullick, and Lara Kaplan, gave me valuable input along the way. Objects conservator Cheryl Podsiki, known for her work with handheld XRF pesticide analysis of ethnographic objects, was also a valuable resource. Senior photographer Mitro Hood and the BMA installation team helped show the mask to its best advantage, and the BMA conservation members were cheerleaders throughout the treatment. Many thanks to all!

The mask is on view in Beyond Flight: Birds in African Art through June 17, 2018.

 

Top 20 #HeartsForArt Picks

This year, we celebrated Valentine’s Day by joining museums across the country to spread love for #HeartsForArt. This is the fourth year visitors, staff, and volunteers wandered the galleries, leaving colorful paper hearts in front of their favorite works of art. More than 1,600 hearts were distributed and nearly 400 works received some love.

The votes are in! Here are this year’s top 20 picks:

  1. Tomás Saraceno, Entangled Orbits
  2. Phaan Howng, The Succession of Nature
  3. Tomás Saraceno, 80SW iridescent/Flying Garden/Air Port City
  4. Tomás Saraceno, Hybrid solitary semi social semi social SAO 90734 built by: a solo Nephila senegalensis one week, a duet of Cyrtophora citricola three weeks, a quartet Cyrtophora citricola juvenile two weeks
  5. Auguste Rodin, The Thinker
  6. Water-Moon Guanyin (Shuiyue Guanyin)Hebei province, China,
  7. Al Loving, Barbara in Spiral Heaven
  8. Jack Whitten, 9.11.01
  9. Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Dwell: Aso Ebi
  10. Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Dwell: Me, We
  11. Elizabeth Catlett, My right is a future of equality with other Americans
  12. Dave Eggers, Issue 16
  13. Eugene Kupjack, Domestic Interior in a Shaker Community, 1820-1860
  14. Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled” (Water
  15. Auguste Rodin, The Kiss
  16. Emile-Antoine Bourdelle, Head of Medusa (Door Knocker)
  17. Annet Couwenberg, Heritage
  18. Annet Couwenberg, Backstitch
  19. Olafur Eliasson, Flower Observatory
  20. Sam Gilliam, Blue Edge

Thanks for playing along!

Timelapse video shows Tomás Saraceno’s Entangled Orbits

Watch as the brilliant colors in “Tomás Saraceno: Entangled Orbits” transform our East Lobby throughout the day in this time-lapse video captured by Mitro Hood. These iridescent-paneled modules suspended by a net of strings reminiscent of a spider web will be on view at the BMA through July 8, 2018.

Have you seen Entangled Orbits yet?

Pleased to Meet You! Caroline Lampinen joins BMA staff

Carolineweb

Caroline Lampinen: Community Engagement Coordinator

The BMA is excited to introduce the newest member of the Education team, Caroline Lampinen, who joins us as the Community Engagement Coordinator. She works closely with the Manager of Community Engagement, Dave Eassa, to facilitate programming with the BMA Outpost across Baltimore.

What is the BMA Outpost?

The BMA Outpost is a community initiative of the Baltimore Museum of Art, acting as a nomadic and flexible mobile museum that collaborates with a wide range of stakeholders across the city of Baltimore for periods of three months at a time. The Outpost engages communities through artmaking, conversations, and visual connections to the BMA’s physical collection. The Outpost’s democratic and collaborative programming is guided by the overarching theme of “home” and the diverse representations and emotions that each individual can bring to the conversations around home. The BMA Outpost encourages residents to contribute drawings, paintings, ideas, and conversations to build a museum about their community by the community. It becomes a space where the unrecorded conversations and dialogue are just as important as the ideas documented and contributed through visual art.

Who is Caroline?

Caroline grew up in metro-Detroit with a musician father and nurse mother. After earning a BFA in Graphic Design from Western Michigan University, she moved to rural Arkansas where she taught literacy for four years and coached novice teachers for three, earning a Master’s in Educational Leadership along the way. From there she spent a year as an Education Pioneers Fellow at Denver Public Schools. Her passions include building, fostering, and teaching inclusive and equitable practices for all people in all industries; running; spending time with her rescue dog, Blue; and art making.

Visit the Outpost!

Starting Jan. 23, the BMA Outpost will begin its next three-month collaborations with the Loch Raven VA Clinic working with veterans, and at the Cherry Hill Town Center working with the residents of Cherry Hill.

Caroline will be facilitating programming at Cherry Hill Town Center, collaborating with Catholic Charities to turn an unused store front into a dynamic arts and community space for the next three months.

Come visit any time during our open hours! Be sure to check our website, Instagram, and our Facebook and Twitter pages for any changes, or to find out about any of our other amazing programs!

Cherry Hill Town Center Hours:

Tuesday: 3pm-7pm
Wednesday: 4-8pm
Thursday: 3pm-7pm

BMA Voices

BMA Voices is a collection of stories about home, but most importantly they are a collection of stories from you, our guests. The Imagining Home exhibition in the Joseph Education Center is a cross-collection exhibition of objects, sculpture, painting, photography, textiles, and more that highlight the diversity of what the idea of Home can mean to someone. Every Saturday and Sunday, our Gallery Interpreters will be working with the public to identify works in the exhibition that resonate with individuals and their stories. This blog serves as an archived history of those conversations.

Maja

Maja

Eugene and Henry Kupjack
Urban New England Dining Room, 1800 – 1815
1983

I moved around a lot when I was younger, so home was always a thought, emotion, or a memory. Not having the physical space made me reflect internally, constantly dreaming about that perfect dream home. A dog, named Scooter, white picket fence, polished silverware so I could host huge dinner parties, all the good stuff. I guess I wanted to be a princess in a pretty castle all to myself and a very cute dog. Later in life I moved in with my parents and found it hard to just be in one place for so long after moving so much, but in the end I got more than my dog and castle; I got a very beautiful home with an amazing family.

Melissa

Melissa

Starlee Kline
Issue 10
2010

Last year, I had just gotten kicked out and simultaneously broken up with. That was the end of two relationships. I moved in with my best friend and we filled the void with cooking. It was like the more food got chopped, the less my heart did. I healed through avoidance kind of, because cooking and ignoring my own shortcomings helped everything hurt less. Life moved on, so did I, and things began to change again; I found myself repeating this process except now I don’t have a cutting board or a best friend. Just a boyfriend, a mom and a cat that seemingly feel bad for me.

Jessie

Jessie

Frances Benjamin Johnston
Wye Plantation or Paca House, Queen Anne County, Maryland
1936-1937

Ever since graduating college in 2013, I have lived a nomadic life. I’ve had many jobs and moved 9 times. I spent a lot of time in Sullivan County, NY, about 2 hours northwest of NYC. Sullivan County, while in a beautiful part of the country, has many abandoned homes. Most recently, I have moved to East Baltimore where I have seen similar issues. Blocks and blocks of abandoned row houses. I am new to this community but it is my home now. I have grown to love it more and more as time passes and as I meet more beautiful people. I am originally from the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. I lived there from age 7 to age 22. That was my home. Home is still my parent’s house on the top of the hill. I will always love my home. Now that I’ve lived in many places and seen houses that are boarded up and overgrown, it breaks my heart. What happened? Why has no one moved back? Why did former owners leave? If walls could talk, right? There may be some who know once roamed the walls, but for now, only imagination can tell. I imagine living there. I imagine a family there. I imagine having the funds tho breather life back into the space. Unrealistic, sure, but I’m a dreamer. I hope. I go home to my apartment in East Baltimore, thankful for where I am and I wonder where I shall call home next.

Zakyree

Zakyree

Frances Benjamin Johnston
Mills Point, St. Mary’s County, Maryland
1936-1937

There’s something about wide, open, seemingly “empty” spaces that reminds me of where I’m from. Or at least how I thought about my home as a child and the small city I grew up in. Frances Benjamin Johnston’s work “Mills Point” strikes me as the style in which my mother likes to keep your family house – grand and like no one lives there. As if its a show house ready for an open house at anytime. My parents are truly big hearted people but striving towards perfection in a space that’s function is typically associated with comfort, nesting, and relaxation is frustrating, ya know?

Follow along as our Gallery Interpreters work with the public every Saturday and Sunday in the Joseph Education Center Galleries at http://blog.artbma.org/bma-voices/.

Explore the beauty of birds in Beyond Flight: Birds in African Art

Need an art break? Take a quick tour of the new exhibition, Beyond Flight: Birds in African Art with Associate Curator of African Art Kevin Tervala.

Watch Below:

Beyond Flight presents approximately 20 works from sub-Saharan artists who drew inspiration from the birds that occupied their world. This exhibition explores the varied roles of birds across 19th and 20th-century African states, societies, and cultures. From the largest ostrich to the smallest warbler, the works on view highlight the symbolic meaning and aesthetic appreciation of birds in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, and Uganda.

Which work is your favorite?

Beyond Flight: Birds in African Art is on view at the BMA through June 17, 2018.

Art After Hours: Future/Nature at the BMA

Did you make it to Art After Hours this fall?

The party on Friday, Nov. 3, was inspired by the work in four amazing exhibitions: iridescent spheres and spider webs in Tomás Saraceno: Entangled Orbits; colorful, swirling collages in Spiral Play: Loving in the ‘80s; digitally produced textiles and sculptures in Annet Couwenberg: From Digital to Damask; and the intense, immersive environment of Phaan Howng: The Succession of Nature.

There were so many things to do! Visitors stopped by to:

•Build a giant inflatable futurist sculpture with architecture students from Maryland Institute College of Art and Morgan State University
•Make a wearable rope spiral with Clare Nichols
•Watch a performance by Baltimore-based artist Phaan Howng in the immersive environment she created with unnatural colors inspired by toxic waste
•Chat with artist Annet Couwenberg about her new work inspired by the biology of fish and her passion for digital and traditional fabrication processes
•Browse a carnivorous plant demo and sale with the Mid-Atlantic Carnivorous Plant Society
•Make a miniature laser-cut sculpture with Open Works
•Enjoy music by DJ Dubble8 and drinks and light bites by City Seeds

Click through our photo gallery below, and share with your friends. The next Art After Hours takes place Friday, March 23. Save the date!

Art After Hours: November 2017

(Photos by Maximilian Franz)

Los Tres Grandes on view in Crossing Borders: Mexican Modernist Prints

A new exhibition opened this fall at The Baltimore Museum of Art, highlighting our rarely shown collection of prints and drawings by renowned Mexican artists from the 1930s to the 1940s.

Crossing Borders: Mexican Modernist Prints features 30 works on paper by artists such as Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, known as “Los Tres Grandes,” or the Three Great Ones, as well as images by Elizabeth Catlett. The works on view document the political, social, and cultural shifts that took place in the years following the Mexican Revolution.

Take a quick tour of the exhibition in this short clip with Senior Curator Rena Hoisington:

Crossing Borders: Mexican Modernist Prints is on view through March 11, 2018.

WATCH: Njideka Akunyili Crosby discusses new exhibition at The Baltimore Museum of Art

Artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby invited art enthusiasts inside her creative process the same day her new exhibition, Front Room: Njideka Akunyili Crosby | Counterparts, opened at The Baltimore Museum of Art.

On the heels of being named a 2017 MacArthur Award winner, Crosby sat down with BMA Senior Curator of Contemporary Art Kristen Hileman at The Maryland Institute College of Art to discuss culture, technique, and the beauty of breaking the rules.

WATCH BELOW:

Front Room: Njideka Akunyili Crosby | Counterparts is on view through March 18, 2018. 

[Photo: Mitro Hood]